Inflation has slowed to its lowest level in more than two years, but domestic price pressures remain stubborn and will slow any move to cut interest rates.

Stats NZ figures out today show consumer prices rose 0.5 percent in the three months ended December, taking the annual inflation rate down to 4.7 percent from 5.6 percent – the lowest since June 2021.

The figures were exactly in line with economists’ expectations, but below the Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s November forecast of a 0.8 percent rise.

Higher costs of building and running a house, such as rates, rent and insurance, drove the quarterly increase offsetting cheaper food and fuel.

“The price of housing increased over 2023. Rent is 4.5 percent more expensive than at the end of last year,” Stats NZ senior manager of prices Nicola Growden said.

“Prices for about one-third of all items in the CPI basket decreased in the December 2023 quarter, the most in over three years.”

However, the numbers showed that domestic factors – so-called non-tradeables – are now the dominant driver of inflation, rising 1.1 percent for the quarter and 5.9 percent for the year.

Core inflation measures, which eliminate more volatile components, were at 5 percent.

Economists predicted a 0.5 percent increase in prices for the quarter, and 4.7 percent for the year.

In November, the RBNZ expressed its impatience at the slowness in inflation’s decline and even threatened a further rate rise if progress was not made.

Financial markets are putting an 80 percent chance of a cut to the Official Cash Rate to 5.25 percent in May, and definitely two cuts by the end of the year.

Recent numbers have shown the economy slowing markedly with weaker activity in the manufacturing and services sectors, and soft consumer spending, with some economists already suggesting the economy is in recession which would back the case for lower rates.

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